GRDS Renewal: challenge three

We’ve identified five key General Retention and Disposal Schedule (GRDS) challenges that you can read about in this Discussion Paper. We need your help to shape the GRDS!

GRDS Renewal Challenge 3: Numbering

From the responses received so far to our GRDS Renewal discussion paper, NUMBERING is by far the worst pain point for public authorities and the greatest barrier to effectively implementing the GRDS.

While responses to the GRDS version 7 release have been overwhelmingly positive, many of you have indicated that implementing the revised schedule into an eDRMS is too time-consuming and resource intensive. Based on this we know that some form of unique numbering is required – but we need your help to determine what form this numbering will take.

Challenge 3

Why do we have numbers in our schedules at all?

Numbering is an important part of the disposal authorisation because:

  • it assists transparent, accountable and consistent disposal of public records; and
  • it enables public authorities to demonstrate (to the public, the courts, etc.) that public records have lawfully been destroyed.

Information Standard (IS) 31 – Retention and disposal of public records sets out the minimum numbering requirements for disposal documentation (for schedules, this is the QDAN, version number and record class number from the schedule).

As part of the GRDS Renewal process, everything is on the table and we can change IS31 down the track if required. So if each record class has a unique disposal authorisation number, QDANs and version numbers could become a thing of the past!

Case Study – another possible solution?

While entering the GRDS numbering into an eDRMS is difficult for many agencies, a couple of our agencies already get around this by not importing any record class numbers into their system at all. Instead the reference numbers they enter are based around the retention periods as follows:

QDAN 249-E-000 Ephemeral – Short term temporary
QDAN 249-PERM Permanent retention
QDAN 249-T-001 1 year retention
QDAN 249-T-002 2 year retention
QDAN 249-T-003 3 year retention
QDAN 249-T-005 5 year retention
QDAN 249-T-007 7 year retention
QDAN 249-T-010 10 year retention
QDAN 249-T-015 15 year retention
QDAN 249-T-020 20 year retention
QDAN 249-T-025 25 year retention
QDAN 249-T-030 30 year retention
QDAN 249-T-050 50 year retention
QDAN 249-T-070 70 year retention
QDAN 249-T-075 75 year retention
QDAN 249-T-080 80 year retention
QDAN 249-T-080-HR 80 year retention (Personnel)
QDAN 249-T-100 100 year retention

The relevant reference number from the schedule is then recorded at the time of the disposal as part of the internal disposal authorisation process.

When the GRDS is updated, the agency scans the summary of changes to locate changes to retention periods and the relevant eDRMS files then have their retention codes changed in the system.

So to help with the renewal journey we have some questions for you.

Does your system require reference numbers do you just need the retention period so that disposal dates can be calculated?

Can your system handle unique barcode reference numbers?

Could your system handle a reference string (like the one used by the University Sector, e.g. 601.3/C133)?

Would your numbering preferences change if functions and/or activities were removed from the GRDS?

Of all the options discussed in the blog and discussion paper, what is your number 1 preference?

Do you have any other suggestions that would help with the implementation of a schedule into a system?

We would love to hear from you so why not drop us a line to rkqueries@archives.qld.gov.au or leave a comment below.

2 thoughts on “GRDS Renewal: challenge three

  1. Having a reference number that just indicates how long a record needs to be kept provides no context and files will still have to be converted each time a QDAN is reviewed. It also assumes everyone using it knows and understands the appraisal process.

    We are increasingly under pressure to train new people to appraise records and this is assisted by the current numbering and description provided. We would support static numbering that only requires a change to the retention period of each reference number following a review. Responses to your questions are as follows:

    Does your system require reference numbers do you just need the retention period so that disposal dates can be calculated? We have used three different EDRMS in the last 4 years and all require a unique code or reference. The retention period is also entered and used to calculate the trigger.

    Can your system handle unique barcode reference numbers? Barcodes are so 20th century but most EDRMS have some method of handling them.

    Could your system handle a reference string (like the one used by the University Sector, e.g. 601.3/C133)? In all 3 systems we have used we enter the QDAN ref eg. QDAN247-v7-2.3.6

    Would your numbering preferences change if functions and/or activities were removed from the GRDS? Possibly.

    Of all the options discussed in the blog and discussion paper, what is your number 1 preference? Static numbering based on subject.

    Do you have any other suggestions that would help with the implementation of a schedule into a system?
    Set requirements in your EDRMS guidelines for agencies to select systems that provide metods of uploading schedules to their EDRMS (preferrably via the front end). Most vendors refer to these guidelines when quoting how compliant their product is. Make it a mandatory requirement and this will assist agencies to get vendors to write something for them.

    Like

    • Thanks for taking the time to provide your feedback on this challenge Angie! You’ve given us a few things to think about, and we appreciate your comments on this and our ‘Diving into the GRDS’ post from September. We’d also love to know your thoughts on our next post, so keep an eye out for the GRDS Renewal implementation blog.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s