Protecting your records in a disaster

With yet another storm warning bearing down on Queenslanders, many of us will be reminded of the Queensland floods and cyclones that hit in 2010-2011, and then again early 2013.

Not to mention the more recent hail events that have seen many of us lined up again with our insurance companies!

The 2010-2011 Queensland natural disasters impacted on a number of organisations across the State. Flooding was widespread from the November 2010 through to January 2011. Then to rub salt in our wound, Cyclone Yasi made landfall in northern Queensland in February 2011.

During this tumultuous time, some 120 organisations were identified as located within flood zones, with another 23 organisations in areas affected by Cyclone Yasi.

Many organisations were reporting records being washed away in flood waters, while others had records pulped beyond recognition and lost to the mud and muck.

How thankful we all were for the formation of the ‘mud army’ who demonstrated heroic efforts during the horrendous task of clean-up.

We too jumped into action to assist organisations at this time. Helping them to identify, document, and where possible salvage records that had sustained damage.

Our wonderful preservation experts provided advice on how to:

While our archivists and policy team developed streamlined processes to:

This enabled organisations to recover what records they could, and document the loss of others in case of events such as current or future legal action, audits or Right to Information applications.

But it’s not all doom and gloom.

While such storms will always have the potential to wreak havoc, now we at least have the marvel of technology affording us storm warnings and time to prepare.

So, protect your assets! Before the next disaster strikes.

Act now – review your records storage arrangements and your disaster management and business continuity plans.

In anticipation of the next big Queensland storm, get ready with our guidance on:

Check out more of our advice to help you protect your corporate memory and vital assets here.

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